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DMO Explained

Within the back of your eye, there is a network of tightly woven cells and blood vessels that form a barrier to control substances entering or leaving your retina. The retina is where all of the images you see are recorded – it acts like the film in a camera.

DMO is a condition that damages this barrier, allowing fluid to leak through – this leakage causes swelling. The macula is the part of the retina responsible for central and fine vision. When the macula swells with fluid, central vision becomes blurry.

The diagram below shows which areas of the eye are affected by DMO.

DMO is caused by long-term exposure to high blood sugar levels caused by diabetes.

Other things that can increase your risk of developing DMO, or make it worse are ‘lifestyle’ factors including smoking, drinking too much alcohol and being overweight. Quitting smoking greatly lowers the risk of damage to your eyes as well as improving your general health. If you are overweight, losing weight and eating healthily may also help protect your eyesight. Your GP can help you with quitting smoking and losing weight.

Remember: it is important to follow your eye doctor’s advice and to make sure you keep all of your appointments with your doctor, whether for treatment or check-ups.

There are several treatment options for DMO and they work in different ways.

Generally, these treatments work by shrinking and sealing up the leaking blood vessels and can involve injections or laser therapy.

Since no two people are alike, there is no one-size-fits-all solution. Your doctor will choose a treatment best-suited for your individual needs.

Being diagnosed with visual impairment due to DMO and experiencing problems with your eyesight can be an anxious time. It is normal to worry and feel uncertain about your future, but your diagnosis doesn’t mean you can no longer live a full life. You can continue to enjoy family, friends and interests with some small changes.

Some helpful advice includes:

  • Tell friends and family that you have DMO and how it affects your eyesight
  • Use brighter lighting
  • Organise your surroundings so it is easier to find things
  • Use torches and magnifying lenses when needed. Take them with you when you go out
  • Read large-print books and newspapers and try audio books or computers with large-print settings

For more helpful tips on living with DMO, please see the information on support groups.

However much you are affected by DMO, it is important to remember that you are not alone. It may be difficult to understand your diagnosis or to come to terms with it. Speaking to experts can help answer questions you may have, while speaking to others who are in, or have been in, a similar situation to yourself can help you come to terms with your diagnosis.

If you would like to find out more, or be put in touch with other people suffering from DMO, a list of useful contacts can be found below. You can write to these organisations, phone them or go to their websites. These organisations will have downloadable files of information which can be printed or read on the screen. They may also be able to provide their information in audio format for you to listen to.

www.macularsociety.org

www.rnib.org.uk

www.diabetes.org.uk

EYLEA is a type of treatment known as an anti-VEGF. This is an abbreviation for anti-vascular endothelial growth factor, which is a description of how EYLEA works to protect your vision.

EYLEA blocks a particular protein that causes development of new weaker blood vessels in your eye. This can help prevent leakage of fluid from these new blood vessels, protecting your vision.

EYLEA is a solution (a liquid) that is injected into the eye.

While it is understandable to worry about an injection, your doctor will make sure the surface of your eye is numb so you should feel no more than a little pressure during the procedure.

However much you are affected by DMO, it is important to remember that you are not alone. It may be difficult to understand your diagnosis or to come to terms with it. Speaking to experts can help answer questions you may have, while speaking to others who are in, or have been in, a similar situation to yourself can help you come to terms with your diagnosis.

If you would like to find out more, or be put in touch with other people suffering from DMO, a list of useful contacts can be found below. You can write to these organisations, phone them or go to their websites. These organisations will have downloadable files of information which can be printed or read on the screen. They may also be able to provide their information in audio format for you to listen to.

Helpline: 0300 3030 111
Address: The Macular Society, PO Box 1870, Andover SP10 9AD
Email: info@macularsociety.org
Website: www.macularsociety.org


Telephone: 0303 123 9999
Address: RNIB Headquarters, 105 Judd Street, London WC1H 9NE
Email: helpline@rnib.org.uk
Website: www.rnib.org.uk


Telephone: 0345 123 2399
Address: Wells Lawrence House, 126 Back Church Lane, London E1 1FH
Email: helpline@diabetes.org.uk
Website: www.diabetes.org.uk